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Zineb's War on Islamic Fascism

In August 2011, in the midst of the Arab Spring, Zineb El Rhazoui, a young Moroccan-French woman, stood in a packed forum on human rights in the Arab world and launched a strong attack against Driss El Yazami, the president of Morocco’s Human Rights Council, blaming him for ignoring the myriad oppressions inflicted on human rights activists in Morocco. Zineb, a self-proclaimed atheist, had already an impressive number of activism credentials to her name, including being cofounder of the Alternative Movement for Individual Liberties (known in French as MALI), which became famous for challenging the penal code criminalizing fasting in public during Ramadan. She was a journalist out of a job, too, and she was upset.

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Choosing Which Language to Live In

“I feel closer to an Arab from Morocco than to a Jew from Brooklyn or Boston.”

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Tangier circa 1670

A Brief History of British Tangier

In my book Freedom and Orthodoxy I make it clear that the classical world order was radically altered by Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the continent that would later be bear the name of another European explorer, Amerigo (Americus in Latin) Vespucci.  

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Post-Hassanian Morocco

I remember, vividly, how unsettled I was when I learned of the sudden death of Morocco’s King Hassan II on a hot July day in 1999. Like many people around the world, I was glued to CNN's coverage of the funeral, as throngs gathered to bid the seasoned monarch adieu and bury him in the mausoleum that houses his father and brother's remains.

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